Countdown to New Year’s: 8 Crazy Nights Giveaway (CLOSED)

12/21 UPDATE: Thanks everyone for playing! We are thrilled to announce our EIGHT winners. Let’s give a major congrats to Ron M., Kara K., Patricia H., Nicole H., Stacy G., Barbara R., Lacey L., and Saundra B. 

12/7 UPDATE: Our 8 Crazy Nights Giveaway Contest is officially live! Be sure to check back on this post daily for the next two weeks to enter our giveaway of the day.

8 Crazy Nights

And just like that, we’re on to our last month of 2015! A little crazy how fast time flies doesn’t it? To complete this year with a bang, we want to present… (dramatic pause) Shoplet’s 8 Crazy Nights Giveaway! To show our readers how much we appreciate them this entire year- we’ve decided to give away eight awesome (and we do mean awesome) prizes each day for eight days in December.

Just a little hint at our lineup to get you guys excited for what’s to come. We’re talking office chairs, photo laminators, security safes, and lots more! Pay close attention to the details because these prizes won’t be available for long.

Here’s how it works: Every day, starting on Monday, December 7th, we will release a new prize on THIS POST. Each item would be available and collecting entries for a limited time ONLY, so be sure to check in each day so you don’t miss out! You will have to enter each giveaway to be qualified for the prize of the day.
(Be sure to scroll all the way down to see the prizes!)

When: Contest begins Monday, December 7th 2015 to Friday, December 18th 2015 (EXTENDED) Sunday, December 20th 2015!

How to Enter: Leave a comment on our blog post answering the question prompt, located on each separate Rafflecopter box. The question each day is different, so be sure to check in before replying! Want extra entries? Complete other tasks through Rafflecopter and follow us on FacebookTwitterPinterestGoogle+ and Instagram too! (Just leave a additional comment with your username & handle so we can count your entry.)

We’re also hiding the comment entries, so don’t be alarm if your reply does not show up right away. All eight winners will be announced at the conclusion of our 8 Crazy Nights Giveaway on Monday, December 21st.


 8 Crazy Nights Giveaway Prizes

DAY ONE: Win a Scotch Laminator! We’re collecting entries Monday 12/7 ONLY.

Leave a comment on our blog post, finishing the lyrics to this traditional Christmas carol: “On the third day of Christmas, what did my true love give to me?”

Thanks for entering our Day 1 Giveaway. The answer was “Three French Hens.”

8 Crazy Nights - Day 1

a Rafflecopter giveaway

DAY TWO: Win a Brecknell Bench Scale! We’re collecting entries Tuesday 12/8 ONLY.

Leave a comment on our blog post, finishing the lyrics to this hilarious modern day Hanukkah song: “Hanukkah is the festival of lights. Instead of one day of presents, we get…”

Thanks for entering our Day 2 Giveaway. The answer was “8 Craaaaaazy Nights!”

8 Crazy Nights - Day 2

a Rafflecopter giveaway

DAY THREE: Win a Amplivox Dynamic Megaphone! We’re collecting entries Wednesday 12/9 ONLY.

Leave a comment on our blog post answering this Trivia Question: “The 8 days of Kwanzaa represents a different principle each day. What does the 6th day represent?”

Thanks for entering our Day 3 Giveaway. The 6th day of Kwanzaa represents “Creativity.” This Kuumba principle stands for continuous improvement.

8 Crazy Nights - Day 3

a Rafflecopter giveaway

DAY FOUR: Win a HSM Continuous-Duty Shredder! We’re collecting entries Thursday 12/10 ONLY. 

Leave a comment on our blog post answering this Trivia Question: “What gave “Boxing Day” its name?”

Thanks for entering our Day 4 Giveaway. Boxing Day was known as the day the family opened the box for the poor, hence the name.

8 Crazy Nights - Day 4

a Rafflecopter giveaway

DAY FIVE: Win a HON Office Chair! We’re collecting entries Friday to Sunday, 12/11 – 12/13!  

Leave a comment on our blog post answering this Trivia Question: “For Three Kings Day, instead of cookies & milk for Santa, what do the children prepare?”

Thanks for entering our Day 5 Giveaway. Children celebrate Three Kings Day by collecting grass and hay to present to the king’s camels.

8 Crazy Nights - Day 5

a Rafflecopter giveaway

DAY SIX: Win a Sentry Safe Firechest! We’re collecting entries Monday 12/14 ONLY.

Leave a comment on our blog post answering this Trivia Question: “What kind of noodles are usually eaten on Japanese New Year or Omisoka?”

Thanks for entering our Day 6 Giveaway. The answer was long noodles like buckwheat noodles or Toshikoshisoba. They are eaten because they are connected to longevity.

8 Crazy Nights - Day 6 a Rafflecopter giveaway

DAY SEVEN: Win a Quartet Dry Erase Glassboard! We’re collecting entries Tuesday 12/15 ONLY.

Leave a comment on our blog post answering this Trivia Question: “What does “Auld Lang Syne” from our traditional New Year’s song mean?”

Thanks for entering our Day 7 Giveaway. Auld Lang Syne means “Times Gone By,” which is why we sing it every New Year’s!

8 Crazy Nights - Day 7

a Rafflecopter giveaway

*DAY EIGHT – GRAND FINALE* Win a New Air Wine Cooler! We’re collecting entries Wednesday to Sunday 12/16 to 12/20. Good Luck!

Watch our video below to find out what our LAST trivia question is…!

8 Crazy Nights - Day 8

Thanks for entering our Day 8 Grand Finale Giveaway! The question in our video asks “Which country was the first to start the tradition of the Christmas Tree?” And it was Germany!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

*Open to U.S. Residents Only

  • Lily Kwan

    Germany

  • Aaron

    Germany

  • Malv

    Germany

  • Paulet

    Germany

  • Marc

    Germany

  • Milt

    Germany

  • Rob

    Germany

  • John Walkinshaw

    Germany

  • kathy d

    What country was the first Christmas tree It was in the son old tanninball

  • Camille

    Days gone by…..remember your friends and loved ones for they make life worth living

  • angela smith

    Germany was the first country to start the tradition of the Christmas tree.

  • angela smith

    Germany was the first country to start the tradition of the Christmas tree

  • Lisa Riley

    Please forgive me for not answering the question in the right blog but I’m new to all of this…I’d like to submit my answer of “Germany” for the 8 Crazy Nights final prize of the New Air USA wine cooler…thanking you in advance and wishing you & yours a very Merry Christmas & a Happy & Healthy New Year :)

  • Paula Hawn

    The tree tradition started in Germany.

  • Emily Lewis

    this is a awesome giveaway

  • Kimberly Rutka

    Germany is where there were the first Christmas trees were located.

  • Kimberly Rutka

    Germany

  • Amanda K

    Is this where I’m supposed to post my answer? Germany is where the Christmas tree originated!!

  • Germany ,is where christmas trees were first,as well as the song o tanebaum(hope I spelled right)

  • Remember your good old friends from the past

  • Germany

  • Angelia Medlin

    Germany

  • Julie Curtis

    The good old days (memories).

  • Lesa Schewe

    Britain

  • The good ole days

  • Lisa Barker

    Germany

  • Jenni Schaub

    Germany!

  • Diane Mentzer

    Germany is credited with starting the tradition of Christmas Trees

  • Amber Bourland

    Germany is the first country to widely use the Christmas tree, though decorated evergreen trees were used in ancient Rome during Saturnalia (which is where our Christmas truly originated).

  • Sonya

    It means for old times sake or long ,long time ago.

  • Times gone by

  • amy newman

    Awesome giveaway! Thanks for the chance!!

  • Limes long past but never forget the past with great people and friends!!

  • Yukia Parker

    Germany

  • Kimberlea

    Germany

  • Leona vandeneynde

    3 French hens

  • Letsy Rivera

    Germany started the Xmas tree tradition

  • The first country to start the tradition of using the Christmas tree is Germany.

  • Tina Eller

    The question for the Grand Finale Prize of the Wine Cooler: The country that started the tradition of the Christmas tree was Germany.

  • Holly Noel

    The country to first start the tradition of the Christmas tree is Germany.

  • Silvia Reid

    Germany

  • Kathy throckmorton

    :”AULD LANG SYNE ” times gone by and old friends have been forgotten so gather around and we will all have a drink and cheer for being more in touch with each other
    and never loose touch again ! : ) it also is for remembering those who have passed .

  • Jennifer Allam

    This first country that started the tradition of the Christmas Tree was Germany.

  • Germany

  • corina deLuna

    The Christmas tree tradition started in Germany.
    Hope I win I would really love this for sodas & wine.

  • Jennifer

    Germany

  • Germany is where the Christmas tree originated

  • Christina McNiel

    Germany

  • danielle fernandez

    The Christmas tree tradition is accredited to have started in Germany I believe in the 1600’s . Thank you !

  • Rhonda Best

    Germany

  • James Mong

    Germany is where the tradition of a CHRISTmas tree started.

  • chuck derr

    Times gone by to remember

  • Germany

  • Tracy Jones

    Times gone by

  • Amber Brown

    times past, the good old days, friendships from such

  • Danielle Lindquist

    The first Christmas tree was in Germany!

  • kari sutton

    Germany… Where my brother was born while our mother served in the Army.

  • kari sutton

    The Good Old Days

    • kari sutton

      Germany.. Where my brother was born while my mother served in the Army.

  • kara kudro

    Germany was the first country to start the tradition of the Christmas Tree

  • Nicole Shaffer

    The first country to start the tradition of the Christmas tree was Germany.

  • Ron Miller

    Germany!

  • Amy Zhang

    Germany was the first to start the Christmas tree tradition.

  • Laura Micele

    First Christmas tree was in Germany

  • Jessica Coker

    Time gone by, old long ago, good old days

  • Jack Przybylski

    This has been a great run of giveaways

  • LeeAnn P.

    Germany

  • Colleen

    Germany is credited with starting the Christmas tree tradition

  • Mike S.

    What is Germany, Alex.

  • Charlyn Trussell

    Germany first used a Christmas tree.

  • Erin Ellis

    Latvia!

  • Germany in 1824! Also known as O Christmas Tree but 1st sung in the 16th century as a tragic love song talking about the “faithful fir tree as contrasting w a faithless lover.”

  • Times gone by.

  • Tiffany Dover

    The Christmas Tree tradition started in Germany!

  • Susan

    The country is Germany

  • Shelton

    I believe Germany started the Christmas tree tradition.

  • gala

    Germany is credited with starting the Christmas tree tradition as we now know it in the 16th century when devout Christians brought decorated trees into their homes.

  • Nicole Henry

    The Christmas tree is said to have been started in Germany.

  • Kerri Stewart

    Germany started the tradition of the Christmas tree & created the song “O Tannenbaum”

  • Helen Wagner

    Germany!!!

  • Diana Smith Hill

    Germany started the tradition of the Christmas Tree.

  • Toni B

    Germany

  • Wanda Patterson

    My answer is Germany

  • Naomie

    Germany started the Christmas Tree tradition

  • Claudia Davis

    The answer is Germany.

  • Saundra Bowers

    Germany started the tradition of the Christmas tree.

  • This was one that I knew easily, but I double-checked the answer anyway.

    Germany is where the Christmas Tree tradition started, and Tannenbaum is a German carol.

    I remember that church leaders of the time stole the tree from pagan religions hoping to make Christianity more appealing to the pagans.

    Thanks for the fun question.

  • Valerie McElroy

    Germany

  • Germany is the first country to start the tradition of the Christmas tree.

  • Rochel S

    Germany started the christmas tree tradiion

  • Kelly Brown

    Germany

  • Teresa Organ

    Germany!!

  • cris

    Germany

  • Larry Williams

    Germany

  • Seyma Shabbir

    The answer is Germany!

  • Elisabeth

    Germany!

  • Jeanna

    Germany!

  • Angela Saver

    I follow on Youtube as Angela Snoozy
    I follow on instagram as angelasnoozy

  • Angela Saver

    Germany was the first country to start the tradition of the Christmas tree! Thank you Shoplet for another awesome giveaway!!!!

  • Susan

    Germany

  • Rust

    Answer for last day – Germany!

    Thanks for the very nice prizes, I’ve enjoyed it!

  • sady

    means remember the past but do not dwell in it to me-let the pas teach you and lead you to a better new year

  • The German soldiers were the first to have a Christmas tree.

  • Jennifer Phillips

    Germany

  • Evans B.

    Germany started the tradition of Christmas trees.

  • Germany! :) Have a blessed day!

  • Cat

    Grand Prizes: Germany

  • #8– Germany was the first country!

  • Summer I.

    Grand prize answer: Germany

  • Robin Wilson

    Germany was the first country to start the tradition of the Christmas tree.

  • Colleen

    While waiting for the video to be posted, here are my other Social media ID’s that I entered with:
    Facebook: Colleen Pethybridge
    Twitter: 20teacher
    Pinterest: 20teacher
    Google+: Colleen Furlong
    Instagram: 20teacher

    • Colleen

      oops, facebook: Colleen Pethybridge Furlong

  • The Japanese New Year starts with a bowl of toshikoshi soba, a long noodle, and vegetables plus fish, for a healthy body and mind

  • Nicole Henry

    times long past

  • Saundra Bowers

    Auld lang syne means-good old days.

  • Aaron

    Love and friendship in times past; old long ago, the good old days.

  • Malv

    Old long since, long long ago and days gone by, for old times sake. A drink shared to symbolize friendhip.

  • Paulet

    We’ll drink a cup of kindness yet, for days gone by, the good old times.

  • Marc

    Recalling love and kindness for days gone by; the good old times.

  • Kirsten

    Times Gone By.

  • Milt

    Remembering friends from the past; so as, not to let them be forgotten.

  • Rob

    For the sake of old times, remembering friends as time goes on.

  • Valerie McElroy

    The basic message is that we should not forget our old friends and should celebrate a reunion with them.

  • @mommy3sons

    Times gone by

  • Kelly Brown

    It means to not forget friends already gone.

  • Teresa Organ

    The title of the Scottish tune translates to “times gone by” and is about remembering friends from the past and not letting them be forgotten.

  • Sandy VanBuskirk

    ‘Old Long Ago’ and is about love and friendship in times past

  • Stacy

    Old long since!

  • Old long ago

  • DailyWoman (Lacey)

    “Auld Lang Syne” means “times gone by”

  • Shannon

    To cherish the past and share with a friend

  • Stacy Giacosa-Bauer

    Auld Lang Syne is about old friends who have parted and meet again. To celebrate their long friendship, they share a drink together and reminisce of memories from long ago. The basic message is that we should not forget our old friends and should celebrate a reunion with them!

  • cris

    old long since” “long long ago”, “days gone by” “old times” “For auld lang syne”, as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as “for (the sake of) old times”.

  • Jeff

    It means “times gone by”

  • Rust

    The meaning is “old long ago” or “good old days.”

  • Kerri Stewart

    Auld Lang Syne means “Times Gone By”

  • Ron Miller

    Old Long Ago

  • toshikoshi-soba noodles

  • Auld Lang Syne is times gone by, remembering friends from the past so they are not forgotten.

  • Jennifer Phillips

    Auld Lang Syne best translation is Times Gone By that I could find.

  • Robin Wilson

    a good translation of the words “auld lang syne” is “times gone by”

  • Gloria

    Times gone by

  • Elisabeth

    It means “times gone by”.

  • It means ‘times gone by’ and its about remembering friends from the past and not letting them be forgotten.

  • Times Gone By

    (not originally meant to be a holiday sign, Guy Lombardo accidentally had his band play it just after midnight one New Years Eve and it became a tradition

    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/12/auld-lang-syne-what-does-it-mean-again/

  • Anne

    “Auld Lang Syne” means something along the lines of “old times” or “times gone by.”

  • Sally Chen

    Times go by

  • gala

    The title may be translated into standard English as “old long since”, or more idiomatically, “long long ago”, “days gone by” or “old times”.

  • Sheryl Edwards

    Toshikoshi Soba, buckwheat noodles, are eaten for a long life/healthy body.

  • Toni B

    Auld Lang Syne means days gone by or old times. :)

  • Debbie Morlock

    The song’s Scots title may be translated into standard English as “old long since”, or more idiomatically, “long long ago”,[4] “days gone by” or “old times”. Consequently, “For auld lang syne”, as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as “for (the sake of) old times”.

  • Auld Lang Synergy means times gone by.

  • Amy Zhang

    Auld Lang Syne means “old long since,” or times long past.

  • Patricia Henderson

    Times Gone by

  • Helen Wagner

    Auld Lang Syne means ” times gone by”.

  • Erin Ellis

    It means Times Long Past.

  • Deb C

    There is more than one interpretation of the phrase “Auld Lang Syne” Such as long, long ago or times gone by .

  • Katherine

    For Old Long Ago

  • Colleen

    The phrase “auld lang syne” translates literally to “old long since” in English and means something akin to “times gone by.

  • Cally516

    I’m not sure what it means something about memory maybe

  • Rochel S

    toshikoshi-soba noodles

  • Aaron

    The Japanese New Year starts with a bowl of toshikoshi soba, a long noodle, and vegetables plus fish, for a healthy body and mind

  • Malv

    A tasty, buckwheat-flour noodle dish called toshikoshi soba, and a vegetable-tofu topping is a good way to start the Japanese New Year.

  • Diane Kleiman

    Toshikoshisoba (buckwheat noodles) are eaten. Eating the long noodles are connected to enjoying a long life.

    twitter- @DianeLori
    Facebook- kleimanlaw
    Pinterest- dlori27
    YouTube-DLori27
    Google+- Diane Kleiman or Diane+

  • Paulet

    A nice bowl of New Year’s Eve noodles, Toshikoshi Soba, made from buckwheat and topped with seaweed and fishcake.

  • Marc

    Toshikoshi Soba, long noodles for a healthy body, and vegetables is the meal for the Japanese New Year.

  • Milt

    A bowl of hot Toshikoshi Soba, buckwheat noodles, with a vegetable topping to ring in the new year

  • Rob

    Year-end soba or Toshikoshi Soba, which are long noodles made from nutritious buckwheat flour.

  • Teresa Organ

    Toshikoshisoba (buckwheat noodles) are eaten. Eating the long noodles are connected to enjoying a long life. This tradition started in the Edo period.(1603-1867)

  • Kerri Stewart

    Long Soba or Udon noodles are eaten to symbolize a long life.

  • Mike S.

    Finally an easy one! Toshikoshi soba :)

  • Stacy Giacosa-Bauer

    Traditionally, “Toshikoshi Soba” (年越しそば, “year-passing buckwheat noodles”) are eaten which promise a long life when eaten on New Year’s Eve (Omisoka).

  • Shannon

    Japanese Soba noodles are enjoyed on New Years

  • Margaret P.

    Soba noodles are eaten on Japanese New Year.

  • toshikoshi-soba, Long Noodle

  • Amy Zhang

    They eat long, toshikoshi-soba noodles.

  • Jerry

    They eat buckwheat noodles

  • cris

    toshikoshi-soba

  • Anne

    For Japanese New Year, toshikoshi soba noodles are served!

  • Claudia Davis

    toshikoshi-soba is eaten on new years!

  • Valerie McElroy

    Soba is traditionally eaten on New Year’s Eve

  • Jennifer Phillips

    Toshikoshi soba or Year Crossing Noodles are eaten on Japanese News Year’s Day

  • Debbie Morlock

    Toshikoshi Soba noodles

  • Shelton

    Soba noodles are eaten on Japanese New Year’s.

  • DailyWoman (Lacey)

    Toshikoshi Soba Noodles are usually eaten on Japanese New Year

  • John W.

    They eat soba noodles for Japanese New Year.

  • Sohair

    Toshikoshisoba (buckwheat noodles) are eaten. Eating the long noodles are connected to enjoying a long life.

  • Ron Miller

    What kind of noodles are usually eaten on Japanese New Year (Omisoka)? Soba noodles

  • susan

    buckwheat noodles are eaten then

  • Tiffany Dover

    toshikoshi-soba

  • Ada Miller

    Soba noodles are usually eat in Japan on New Years.

  • Robin Wilson

    Toshikoshisoba (buckwheat noodles) are usually eaten on Japanese New Year.

  • Soba noodles and Dashi

    http://www.allaboutcuisines.com/recipe/new-years-eve-noodles-omisoka-soba

    New Year’s Eve noodles (Omisoka soba)
    Traditional New Years noodle soup
    Summary

    Yield 4 servings
    Preparation time 20 minutes
    Cooking time 30 minutes
    Main Ingredient Dashi

    Ingredients
    Soup
    •2 sheets deep-fried tofu
    •5 cups dashi, see below
    •2/3 cup each: mirin, soy sauce
    •1 tablespoon sugar
    •1 boneless skinless chicken breast, thinly sliced
    •14 ounces (5-6 cups) soba noodles
    •1 cup cold water
    •8 slices kamaboko fish paste/cake (optional)#
    •2 green/spring onions, finely chopped

    Making Dashi (soup base)
    •2 (4-inch) square pieces kombu
    •2 1/2 quarts water
    •1/2 -ounce bonito flakes

    Instructions

    Making Dashi
    1.Put the kombu in a 4-quart/liter saucepan, cover with the water and soak for 30 minutes.
    2.Set the saucepan over medium heat until the water reaches 150 to 160 degrees F and small bubbles appear around the sides of the pan, 9 to 10 minutes.
    3.Remove the kombu from the pan. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, 5 to 6 minutes. Reduce the heat to low and add the bonito flakes. Simmer gently, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes.
    4.Strain the liquid through a fine mesh strainer lined with muslin or several layers of cheesecloth. Reserve the bonito flakes for another use.
    5.Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Use within 1 week or freeze for up to a month.

    Making the soup
    1.Place the tofu/bean curd in a strainer. Pour hot water over tofu to wash off excess oil.
    2.Slice thinly. Combine tofu, dashi, mirin, soy sauce and sugar in a saucepan. Heat over medium heat to just below boiling. Add chicken; cook until chicken slices are cooked through, about 5 minutes.
    3.In the mean time, boil water in a large saucepan/pot, add the noodles. Bring back to a boil; add cold water. Heat back to a boil again. Drain; rinse the noodles.
    4.Divide noodles between four large bowls. Ladle hot broth over the noodles. Top each with 2 kamaboko slices and green onions. Enjoy
    5.I also add some Shichimi Togarashi – Japanese Mixed Chili Pepper (optional

    See more at: http://www.allaboutcuisines.com/recipe/new-years-eve-noodles-omisoka-soba#sthash.vib15LwL.dpuf

  • What kind of noodles are usually eaten on Japanese New Year (Omisoka)?

    Had to look it up. Toshikoshi Soba.

  • Looks like noodles called Toshikoshi soba are eaten on New Years Eve, but I didn’t see any special ones for the actual New Year.
    <3 J

    jwoolbright at gmail dot com
    HerPeacefulGarden.blogspot.com

  • gala

    Japanese people eat “Toshikoshi Soba” (年越しそば, “year-passing buckwheat noodles”) that promises a long life when eaten on New Year’s Eve (Omisoka).

  • Gloria

    They eat buckwheat noodles on that day

  • Leah Brislin

    Soba noodles are traditionally eaten for Japanese New Year.

  • kara kudro

    toshikoshi soba noodles or long noodles

  • Mary Vantil

    They eat long noodles Thanks

  • scott

    Toshikoshisoba

  • Soba noodles are usually eaten for the Japanese new year.

  • Naomie

    Toshikoshi Soba Noodles

  • Helen Wagner

    Soba noodles. Japanese people practice an old custom on New Year’s Eve called toshikoshi soba, eating “Passing of the Year” soba to bring good luck and good fortune. The shape and length of soba are associated with a lean and long life.

  • Erin Ellis

    They eat toshikoshi soba, or long noodles.

  • Janice McKnight

    Buckwheat noodles called toshikoshi soba are eaten for the Japanese New Year.

  • Geri C

    Soba Noodles

  • Katherine

    ‘Osechi Ryori

    • Katherine

      toshikoshi-soba this is the right answer

  • Colleen

    Toshikoshisoba (buckwheat noodles) are eaten. Eating the long noodles are connected to enjoying a long life. This tradition started in the Edo period.(1603-1867)

  • Nicole Henry

    The Japanese traditionally eat Soba noodles on Omisoka.

  • The name of the noodles are called Toshikoshi soba.
    Also, some Japanese people say, “We eat Soba noodles on New Year’s Eve because the long, thin noodles symbolize longevity.

  • Deb C

    Okake noodles are usually eaten on Omisoka .

  • Buckweheat noodles

  • Aaron

    Many children place hay in shoeboxes and water in containers, for the Three King’s hungry and thirsty camels.

  • Malv

    The children will leave hay in boxes for the Three King’s camels.

  • Paulet

    Children leave hay in their shoeboxes for the Three King’s camels to eat.

  • Marc

    They place grass or hay in boxes and water out for the camels to eat, when the Three Kings bring gifts

  • Milt

    The children prepare a shoebox filled with hay and a bowl of water, for the cameks that ferry the Three Kings from house to house.

  • Rob

    The children put out grass or hay in their shoeboxes for the Three King’s camels to eat

  • Rhonda Pena

    Following via:
    Facebook – Rhonda Peña
    Twitter – @DannyTRhonda
    Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.com/chicomeow/
    YouTube – Rhonda P.
    Google+ – Rhonda P.
    instagram – @dannytaylorrhonda
    email – danrhon (at) gmail (dot) com

  • Rhonda Pena

    A box of grass or hay for the Three Kings’ camels.

  • Shannon

    The traditional Rosca De Reyes

  • Susan

    They set out straw for the camels that came on that day

  • Mike S.

    For 3 kings day, children line up their shoes so that the 3 kings will place presents inside. There is also a circular bread made with a baby jesus figure inside.

  • Interestingly, children would leave out hay, for the three kings’ camels. Camels are sloppy eaters, so the children could then follow the trail of the hay to find their presents.

    Another source said “Grass and water” but since it didn’t give such interesting reasons, I decided to stay with Hay.

  • On Three Kings Day, children traditionally leave hay or grass and water for the camel.

  • For Three Kings Day, instead of cookies & milk for Santa, what do the children prepare?

    I am unfamiliar with this. I’ve seen several answers online ranging from cake to tamales to mince pie and milk. Seems to depend on the region.

  • Rick T

    They place their shoes on the windowsills and fill them with straw, carrots and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings. May leave some food for the Three Kings.

  • Liz N

    shoebox with grass for the camels of the 3 Kings

  • Gloria

    They prepared a box of straw for the camels that came with the Wise Men

  • gala

    Kids place their shoes on the windowsills and fill them with straw, carrots and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings. Sometimes they might also leave some food for the Three Kings.

  • Kelly Brown

    We leave cookies and milk on Christmas Eve….we celebrate Christmas!

  • Cheryl

    Instead of putting out milk and cookies for Santa Claus, Hispanic children put hay or grass under their beds for the three kings’ camels to feast on.

  • kara kudro

    Kings Bread!!! we have made it before it’s wonderful.

  • Naomie

    grass is for the camels to eat

  • DailyWoman (Lacey)

    On Three Kings Day the kids put hay in their shoes and sit them out with some water for the Wise Men.

  • Saundra Bowers

    For Three Kings Day, instead of cookies & milk for Santa, what do the children prepare?: The tradition in England is to leave out some mince pies and milk.

  • Valerie McElroy

    tamales

  • Evelyn

    Straw for the camels to eat in exchange for presents

  • Carmela Capano

    The tradition is to hide a baby Jesus figurine within the bread that is made.

  • Jennifer Phillips

    Tamales

  • Jeff

    straw for the camels to eat

  • Stacy Giacosa-Bauer

    For Three Kings Day, children typically leave grass and water under their beds to feed the king’s camels, in hopes the Kings return the favor with gifts of their own.

  • Amy Z.

    They leave out their old shoes, filled with straw or grass.

  • Teresa Organ

    Children leave out presents in anticipation of the arrival of the Magi on January 5, the night before Three Kings Day. The kids leave a gift of hay and water to nourish and hydrate the Magi’s horses, as the horses needed the energy to carry the kings on their journey to see baby Jesus in Bethlehem.

  • Elisabeth

    A box of grass (or hay) and water!

  • Gold frankincense and myrrh.

  • Diane Kleiman

    “For Three Kings Day, instead of cookies & milk for Santa, what do the children prepare?”

    Kids would gather grass, hay or straw in shoe-boxes for the Magi’s horses or camels — a charming alternative to cookies and milk for Santa. Traditionally, you’ll find religious carvings and artwork of the three kings on horses

    Facebook username-kleimanlaw
    Twitter- @DianeLori
    Pinterest- dlori27
    YouTube- DLori27
    Google+- Diane+
    Email-kleimanlaw at aol dot com

    Diane K.
    kleimanlaw at aol dot com

  • For Three Kings Day, instead of cookies & milk for Santa, what do the children give grass and water for the camels.

  • Kirsten

    I had to look this up. I was clueless. I found this on americianbible.org: On the eve of Epiphany, children prepare for the arrival of the kings by filling shoeboxes with straw or grass cuttings and placing them under their beds. The next morning, the children awaken to find their shoeboxes filled with “gifts from the kings.” The grass or straw has been “eaten” by the camels, and the kings have left gifts for the children just as they did when they found the baby Jesus and worshiped him. // But I also read Children leave their shoes right outside their doors so the Three Kings will leave their gifts inside, the bigger presents are placed around them. //

  • Mary Vantil

    box of grass (or hay) and water for The Three King’s camels to eat.

  • For kings day, an oval shaped bread is bought and filled with dried fruit and doll. A piece is cut and the one who gets the doll makes tamales.

  • I had to look up about the Three Kings Day. Best I can tell, children in Latin America leave a shoe out with some hay for the beasts of the Magi. The next morning the hay is gone and a gift is found instead.
    <3 J

    jwoolbright at gmail dot com
    HerPeacefulGarden.blogspot.com

  • Shelton

    Never heard of Three Kings day.

  • Susan

    Children fill their shoes or shoe boxes with straw, carrots, and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings. Also, some leave out food for the Three Kings.

  • Sohair

    The kids leave a gift of hay and water to nourish and hydrate the Magi’s horses

  • Daniel M

    They place their shoes on the windowsills and fill them with straw, carrots and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings. Sometimes they might also leave some food for the Three Kings.

  • On THree Kings day kids leave out shiny shoes and squeaky-clean socks hoping to filled with lots of gifts

  • Robin Wilson

    Children leave a box of grass (or hay) and water for The Three King’s camels to eat.

  • For three kings day children leave their shoes out filling them with hay for the camels.

  • Rust

    Tamales or plates of food and sweets.

  • Nicole Henry

    They put their shoes on the windowsills and fill them with straw, carrots and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings. Sometimes they also leave food for the Three Kings.

  • cris

    grass/hay and water

    • cris

      the children make a crown to wear at the table.

  • Toni B

    For Three Kings day children leave hay(sometimes in their shoes) & water for the camels/animals of the magic

  • Geri C

    They place their shoes on the windowsills and fill them with straw, carrots and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings. Sometimes they might also leave some food for the Three Kings.

  • Kerri Stewart

    The children prepare boxes of food for the Three Kings animals. It could be Straw, Barley or Grass for the donkeys or camels.

  • Deb C

    For Three King’s Day, the tradition is to make King’s Bread, sometimes with a Baby Jesus figurine baked inside.

  • day5 chair Creativity/Kuumba

  • Erin Ellis

    They place their shoes on the windowsills and fill them with straw, carrots and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings.

  • Helen Wagner

    Children leave their shoes right outside their doors so the Three Kings will leave their gifts inside, the bigger presents are places around them. Many families leave a box of grass (or hay) and water for The Three King’s camels to eat. Similar to the tradition of leaving out cookies and milk for Santa Claus. Camels are known for being a bit sloppy and leaving a trail of hay behind that children can often follow to their gifts!

  • Diane Bassette

    A box of grass or hay (day 5)

  • Day Five Answer: As a Latina I can tell you with absolute certainty that on Three Kings Day children typically leave grass and water under their beds to feed the kings’ camels, in hopes the kings return the favor with gifts of their own.

  • Angela Saver

    For 3 King’s Day, the children leave a box of grass (or hay) & water for The Three King’s camels to eat.

  • Katherine

    Shoebox of grass sfor the camels

  • sady

    5 packs of post it notes

  • Colleen

    Kids would also gather grass, hay or straw in shoe-boxes for the Magi’s horses or camels — a charming alternative to cookies and milk for Santa.

  • Diane Richards

    They place their shoes on the windowsills and fill them with straw, carrots and barley for the donkeys of the Three Kings. Sometimes they might also leave some food for the Three Kings.

  • Diane Kleiman

    Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master. The servants would also go home on Boxing Day to give ‘Christmas Boxes’ to their families

    Facebook username-kleimanlaw
    Twitter- @DianeLori
    Pinterest- dlori27
    YouTube- DLori27
    Google+- Diane+
    Email-kleimanlaw at aol dot com

    Diane K.
    kleimanlaw at aol dot com

  • Diane Kleiman

    Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master. The servants would also go home on Boxing Day to give ‘Christmas Boxes’ to their families

    Diane K.
    kleimanlaw at aol dot com

  • Shannon

    The higher class gave presents in boxes to the lower class.

  • Cheryl

    servants and tradesmen would receive gifts, known as a “Christmas box”, from their bosses or employers

  • Mike S.

    Various competing theories for the origins of the term boxing day circulate in popular culture, none of which are definitive.[3] However, the Oxford English Dictionary gives the earliest attestations of the term as being from England in the 1830s, defining it as ‘the first week-day after Christmas-day, observed as a holiday on which post-men, errand-boys, and servants of various kinds expect to receive a Christmas-box’.[4]

  • Geri C

    Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master. The servants would also go home on Boxing Day to give ‘Christmas Boxes’ to their families.

  • Aaron

    In Merrie Olde England, servants, who worked on Christmas Day, opened their Christmas or gift boxes, the day after Christmas, and this is the reason for the name Boxing Day.

  • Malv

    The servants or workers usually got their Christmas presents or boxes, the day after Christmas, in Great Britain, hence the name, Boxing Day.

  • Paulet

    In Vicforian England, the homeless or poor received gift boxes, the day following Christmas; so, this is believed to be how the name Boxing Day came about.

  • Marc

    Boxing Day got its name from the tradition of giving workers a Christmas box, on December 26, in Great Britian.

  • Milt

    Boxing day, on December 26, in England was when servants got gift boxes.

  • Rob

    Christmas boxes given to the poor, the day after Christmas, in Great Britian.

  • Valerie McElroy

    Boxing Day is a national Bank Holiday, a day to spend with family and friends and to eat up all the leftovers of Christmas Day.

  • Saundra Bowers

    In churches, it was traditional to open the church’s donation box on Christmas Day, and the money in the donation box was to be distributed to the poorer or lower class citizens on the next day. In this case, the “box” in “Boxing Day” comes from that one gigantic lockbox in which the donations were left.

  • Jeff

    Boxing Day refers to the day when employees received gifts from their employers

  • Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master. The servants would also go home on Boxing Day to give ‘Christmas Boxes’ to their families.

  • John W

    Is this the place to post the answers? I thought our answers would be hidden???

    There is no definitive answer to today’s question, but the best guess for an answer is that employers, estate owners, etc., established this day so that the people who had to work on Christmas Day, taking care of them or doing other important jobs, would have a servant’s holiday, a day to celebrate and receive gifts from the people they served all year long.

    To some people, it is December 26; while others consider it to be the first weekday after Christmas. Needless to say, many private and public servants have come to expect gifts on this day.

    John

  • Summer I.

    Boxing day was a day when servants got Christmas boxes from their Masters.

  • cris

    when a box was given to servants and/or a box was passed around for donations.

  • Stacy Giacosa-Bauer

    “Boxing Day” is a holiday traditionally celebrated the day following Christmas Day, when servants and tradesmen would receive gifts, known as a “Christmas box”, from their bosses or employers. Today, Boxing Day is the bank holiday that generally takes place on December 26th.

  • Kerri Stewart

    The receiving of Christmas “Boxes” from employers the day after Christmas.

  • Rust

    Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master. The servants would also go home on Boxing Day to give ‘Christmas Boxes’ to their families.

  • Jack Przybylski

    After researching Boxing Day, it seems there is no one answer and have stopped looking for one, did learn something though

  • In the UK, Boxing Day is a holiday traditionally celebrated the day following Christmas Day, when servants and tradesmen would receive gifts, known as a “Christmas box”, from their bosses or employers.

  • Evans B.

    What gave “Boxing Day” its name? — It’s traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master.

  • Teresa Organ

    “Boxing Day is so called because it was the custom on that day for tradesmen to collect their Christmas boxes or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year.”

  • I think I remember that Boxing Day got its name in England on the day after Christmas when boxes were prepared and distributed to the needy.
    <3 J

    jwoolbright at gmail dot com
    HerPeacefulGarden.blogspot.com

  • Sonya Morris

    I have no clue why it is called Boxing Day! In my house it would be so we could box up the decorations and put them up in the attic!

  • Kirsten

    I read about it on Snopes and apparently there are many myths and a few theories. “The holiday’s roots can be traced to Britain, where Boxing Day is also known as St. Stephen’s Day. Reduced to the simplest essence, its origins are found in a long-ago practice of giving cash or durable goods to those of the lower classes. Gifts among equals were exchanged on or before Christmas Day,
    but beneficences to those less fortunate were bestowed the day after. Although there is general agreement that the holiday is of British origin and it has to do with giving presents to the less fortunate, there is still dispute as to how the name came about or precisely what unequal relationship is being recognized. “

  • Mary Vantil

    Boxing Day is a national Bank Holiday and a day to spend with family

  • Naomie

    the first week-day after Christmas-day, observed as a holiday on which post-men, errand-boys, and servants of various kinds expect to receive a Christmas-box

  • Daniel M

    Some historians say the holiday developed because servants were required to work on Christmas Day, but took the following day off. As servants prepared to leave to visit their families, their employers would present them with gift boxes.

  • Debbie Morlock

    I think blog comment posted previously before I typed comment. Boxing Day is a British tradition of giving a box to servants and tradesmen the day after Christmas (12/26). Now its a bank holiday.

  • Diane Bassette

    when servants and tradesmen would receive gifts, known as a “Christmas box”, from their bosses or employers

  • Gloria

    It was a day off for servants and a day when they were given a Christmas box

  • Susan

    The boxing day name exact origin isn’t known but a couple theories are to do with boxes in churches for donations and employers putting coins in boxes for their employees.

  • Shelton

    I have no idea.

  • Toni B

    Servants & tradesman would receive a “Christmas Box” from their employer or boss :)

  • gala

    Boxing Day received its name because the gifts (from Aristocrats to workers and servants) were placed in boxes

  • Robin Wilson

    There are different theories as to how Boxing Day got it’s name. The most popular is it’s a day traditionally celebrated the day following Christmas Day, when servants and tradesmen would receive gifts, known as a “Christmas box”, from their bosses or employers.

  • Anne

    Boxing day was the day employers gave Christmas gifts (boxes) to employees and tradesmen in the UK.

  • Boxing day is December 26th. It came from when servants would get receive a box with goodies that they normally wouldn’t be able to get.

  • Susan Thevenard

    Day 4: Boxing Day is a holiday traditionally celebrated the day following Christmas Day, when servants and tradesmen would receive gifts, known as a “Christmas box”, from their bosses or employers
    Twitter id is @coralrae21

  • Helen Wagner

    Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master. The servants would also go home on Boxing Day to give ‘Christmas Boxes’ to their families.

  • Katherine

    Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants and the day when they received a ‘Christmas Box’ from the master.

  • Nicole Henry

    It was traditionally the day that the servants had off and and received their “Christmas Box” (aka present) from their masters.

  • Colleen

    Boxing Day:
    The holiday developed because servants were required to work on Christmas Day, but took the following day off. As servants prepared to leave to visit their families, their employers would present them with gift boxes

  • Deb C

    Boxing Day is named for the day traditionally gave “Christmas Boxes” full of goods to their employees and tradesmen.

  • Sohair

    Boxing Day began in England, in the middle of the nineteenth century, under Queen Victoria. Boxing Day, also known as St. Stephen’s Day, was a way for the upper class to give gifts of cash, or other goods, to those of the lower classes.December 26th, Boxing Day takes place on December 26th or the following Monday if December 26 falls on a Saturday or Sunday.

  • Jennifer Phillips

    In Britain Boxing is the same as presents or gifts here, and it got it’s name out of the need to do something with all the empty boxes on Christmas so they are used to fill with gifts for friends and neighbors to be given on the 26th of Dec.

  • Angela Saver

    Boxing Day is called it because it was the custom on that day for tradesmen to collect Christmas boxes in return for good and reliable service throughout the year. Boxing Day is December 26 & is celebrated in Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and other Commonwealth countries.

  • Mike S.

    Continuous Improvement

  • Stacy Giacosa-Bauer

    Creativity (Kuumba)

  • Aaron

    Kuumba for creativity.

  • Beth

    Creativity is emphasized that day

  • Ken Bradley

    Kuumba or Creativity

  • Malv

    Kuumba; Creativity

  • Nicole Shaffer

    Creativity/Kuumba Day: Six Day of Kwanzaa

  • Paulet

    Kuumba = Creativity

  • Marc

    Kuumba means creativity.

  • Milt

    Kuumba is Creativity

  • evelyn

    The 6th day focuses on creativity

  • Saundra Bowers

    The sixth day of wanzaa represents Creativity.

  • Valerie McElroy

    The 6th day represents Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah) or Creativity

  • Jennifer Phillips

    Kuumba/CREATIVITY

  • Rob

    Kuumba or creativity

  • According to http://officialkwanzaawebsite.org/NguzoSaba.shtml
    there are SEVEN principles, and the sixth one that you are asking for is Creativity, or Kuumba

    John

  • Martina Kull

    Day 6 CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

  • Patricia Henderson

    Creativity!

  • cris

    Kuumba

  • Stacy

    Day 6 of Kwanzaa is Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

  • Elisabeth

    Creativity!

  • Amy Z.

    The 6th day of Kwanzaa represents Creativity (Kuumba).

  • Ada Miller

    I’m a little confused by the question but after googling & reading and this is what i found for an awesner to the question. On the sixth day during Kwanzaa the black candle is lit, then the utmost left red, the extreme right green, the next kinarared, the subsequent green and then the final red candle. This represents the 6th principle of Kwanzaa i.e. Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah) or Creativity.

  • Rochel S

    6th day represents Creativity

  • DailyWoman (Lacey)

    6th Day represents Creativity

  • Tiffany Dover

    This day occurs on New Year’s Eve and considered special. There is often a celebration or feast that accompanies the ritual lighting of the candles (for this day, the last of the red ones). The eldest member present will also read the Tamishi La Tutaonana, a farewell statement to the old year.

  • Kerri Stewart

    Kuumba which means Creativity

  • The 6th day represents Kuumba or Creativity.

  • Kuumba means creativity.

  • gala

    the 6th day of Kwanzaa represents Creativity.

  • Shelton

    The 6th day; I have no idea.

  • Tamala

    Creativity

  • Diane Kleiman

    The sixth day of Kwanzaa: The day focuses on Kuumba or creativity.

    This principle of the Nguzo Saba is a vow to being creative in the name of restoring black people to their traditional greatness by leaving the community more beautiful and beneficial.

    Diane K.
    @DianeLori

  • Anne

    Kwanzaa Day Six is Kuumba (Creativity). (Kwanzaa has seven days, not eight.)

  • Naomie

    “Kuumba” — Creativity

  • Helen Wagner

    6th day of Kwanzaa repeesents Creativity. It is celebrated on New Years Eve.

  • Mary Vantil

    The 6th day represents Creativity

  • Betty N

    Creativity

  • Erin Ellis

    Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah) or Creativity

  • Katherine

    creativity and the black candle is lit

  • Colleen

    Day 3: Creativity

  • Deb C

    Sixth day of Kwanzaa = Kuumba

  • Toni B

    the 6th day of Kwanzaa represents “CREATIVITY”

  • Wanda Patterson

    Kuumba means creativity.

  • Angela Saver

    I follow on YouTube as Angela Snoozy, which is different than my name for the Rafflecopter giveaway form, but there is no box to leave my username. For future giveaways, can you please include a box for our usernames for each social media entry, so we are sure to get credit?

    Thank you!!!

    • Michelle Liu

      Thanks for subscribing to our Youtube Channel. Just leave a comment on our blog with your username (or handle), and we’ll make sure to give you credit!

  • Angela Saver

    I follow on Google+ as Angela Snoozy, which is different than my name for the Rafflecopter giveaway form, but there is no box to leave my username. For future giveaways, can you please include a box for our usernames for each social media entry, so we are sure to get credit?

    Thank you!!!

    • Michelle Liu

      Thanks for following us on G+. Your entry is counted

  • Angela Saver

    I follow Shoplet on instagram as angelasnoozy, which is different than my username on the Rafflecopter giveaway form, but there is no box for me to list my username. Can you please include a box for future giveaways for our usernames to be listed so we are sure to get credit?

    Thank you!

    • Michelle Liu

      Thanks for following us on Instagram. Your entry is counted

  • Angela Saver

    The 6th principle of Kwanzaa represents creativity!

  • Kerri Stewart

    We have eight crazy nights!

  • Sohair

    The sixth day of Kwanzaa represents or focuses on Kuumba or creativity

  • Shannon

    It represents Creativity (Kuumba)

  • Rochel S

    Chanukah is the festival of lights
    Instead of one day of presents, we have eight crazy nights

  • we have eight crazy nights

  • Aaron

    eight crazy nights

  • Rob

    My favvorite Pinterest board on Shoplet is the “Care, Share, Grow.” board.
    Note: the edit function does not work on this giveaway.

  • Vanessa

    eight crazy nights!

  • Teresa Organ

    eight crazy nights

  • Amy Z.

    Hanukkah is the festival of lights; Instead of one day of presents, we get eight crazy nights!

  • Stacy Giacosa-Bauer

    “Hanukkah is the festival of lights.
    Instead of one day of presents,
    we get eight crazy nights.”

    Finish the lyrics to this hilarious modern Hanukkah song: “Hanukkah

  • Malv

    eight crazy nights

  • Diane Richards

    3 French Hens – Cluck, Cluck, Cluck…..

  • Evelyn

    instead of one day of presents, we get 3

  • Paulet

    eight crazy nights

  • Marc

    eight crazy nights

  • Kathleen Gereg

    Eight nights

  • Milt

    eight crazy nights

  • Rob

    eight crazy nights

  • Valerie McElroy

    8 crazy nights

  • we get eight crazy nights quote.

  • Patricia C

    eight crazy nights

  • Sohair

    Hanukkah is the Festival of Lights
    Instead of one day of presents, we have eight crazy nights

    When you feel like the only kid in town without a Christmas tree
    Heres a list of people who are Jewish, just like you and me

  • Rust

    Instead of one day of presents, we have eight crazy nights!

  • Naomie

    9 days

  • Jennifer Phillips

    answer for day 2 comment ” We have 8 crazy nights!”

  • Anne

    Instead of one day of presents, we have eight crazy nights.

  • Katherine

    Eight crazy nights

  • Jeff

    we get 10 instead

  • Shelton

    Kites ???

  • 3 french hens

  • Patricia Henderson

    Eight Crazy Nights

  • Saundra Bowers

    “Hanukkah is the festival of lights. Instead of one day of presents, we get… 8 crazy nights”

  • Angela Flowers

    Eight crazy nights

  • Daniel M

    slights

  • Elisabeth

    eight crazy nights! ;)

  • Gloria

    What a great chance.

  • Robin

    we have eight crazy nights!

  • Tiffany Dover

    we have eight crazy nights!

  • Colleen

    Day 2:
    . . . eight crazy nights

  • Helen Wagner

    …eight crazy nights!

  • cris

    Hanukkah is the festival of lights. Instead of one day of presents, we have eight crazy nights

  • Day two answer is 12.

  • kara kudro

    eight crazy nights!!!!

  • Toni B

    eight crazy nights

  • 8 crazy nights!

  • gala

    Hanukkah is the festival of lights. Instead of one day of presents, we get eight crazy nights

  • Diane Kleiman

    The Chanukkah, the answer is “we have 8 crazy nights”

    Diane K.
    kleimanlaw at aol dot com

  • Betty N

    Eight Crazy Nights

  • Diane Kleiman

    I am so in need of a small desk that has a pull out shelf to put my keyboard to my desktop computer. My computer would go on the top of the desk. NYC apartments are so small so a nice small desk to fit into a corner would be fabulous.

    Diane K.
    kleimanlaw at aol dot com

  • Geri C

    Three French hens

  • Shannon

    Three French Hens

  • Aaron

    Three French hens, two turtle doves
    And a partridge in a pear tree.

  • Malv

    Three french hens
    Two turtle doves and
    A partridge in a pear tree.

  • Deb C

    Answer = Three French hens

    Thanks and Merry Christmas!

  • Paulet

    Three french hens
    Two turtle doves and
    A partridge in a pear tree.

  • Marc

    Three French Hens,
    Two turtle doves
    And a Partridge in a pear tree.

  • Milt

    Three French hens,
    two turtle doves, and a Partridge in a pear tree.

  • Stacy Giacosa-Bauer

    Three french hens
    Two turtle doves and
    A partridge in a pear tree.

  • Teresa Organ

    Three French hens

  • My true love gave to me three french hens

  • Three french hens.

  • Rob

    Three French hens, two turtle doves
    And a partridge in a pear tree.

  • Mike S.

    On the third day of Christmas, my true love gave to me 3 French hens

  • Valerie McElroy

    3 French Hens

  • DailyWoman (Lacey)

    On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me Three French Hens.

  • 3d tv since i stay in the house a lot

  • Gloria

    Thanks for the chance. love it

  • Linda R

    Three french hens!

  • He gave you an office chair.

  • Naomie

    Three French Hens
    Two Turtle Doves
    and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

  • Rita (@TommiesMommy14)

    Three french hens,
    Two turtle doves,
    And a partridge in a pear tree

  • Wanda Patterson

    A partridge in a pear tree. Thanks for the fun giveaway.

  • Martina Kull

    Three french hens

  • Jennifer Phillips

    On the third day it is French Hens, but I have never received any before :D

  • Rochel S

    Three French Hens

  • Rust

    Three French Hens, Two turtle doves And a Partridge in a pear tree!

  • Patricia C

    On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me Three French Hens, Two Turtle Doves and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

  • Robin

    On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me…Three French Hens!

  • Colleen

    On the 3rd Day of Christmas, my True Love gave to me, “3 French Hens”

  • Betty N

    On the Third day of Christmas my true love sent to me
    Three French Hens
    Two Turtle Doves
    and a Partridge in a Pear Tree.

  • Shelton

    What are three French hens.

  • gala

    a new office chair

  • Theresa Thomas

    3 French hens

  • Three French Hens

    (to remember it, I had to sing starting with “5 G-o-o-o-o-l-d rings”

  • Three french hens.

  • Summer I.

    On the 3rd Day of Christmas my true love sent to me 3 French Hens.

  • Sohair

    Three french hens

  • Kerri Stewart

    Three French Hens, Two Turtle Doves & a Partridge in a Pear Tree!

  • Elisabeth

    Three French Hens!

  • Anne

    On the third day of Christmas, my true love gave to me: Three French Hens, Two Turtle Doves, and a Partridge in a Pear Tree!

  • Angela Flowers

    Three French hens

  • On the third day of Christmas my true love sent to me: Three French Hens.

  • Katherine

    3 French Hens

  • Katherine

    Not sure of the question but I would love a laminator for daughters classroom

  • Ariana

    Amazing

  • Robin Yurkon

    So in need of a desk/ computer area make over. It is so hard keeping up with emails and keeping my area neat and I am in desperate need of this make over, it really would make my life so much easier. Keeping everything organized is so hard with 2 little ones. Plus I have tried and tried but I guess I am not good at keeping that area neat. Thank you for the chance, hope I win!!

  • You say “two weeks” in one place and “8 nights” in another. The time span is 12 days. I’m confused, but I will check in.

    P.S. I love your backpack. It’s lighter to carry my laptop in it than in the computer bag I’d bought last year.

    John

    • Michelle Liu

      Thanks John for your comment. We’ve updated the blog post to clarify the giveaway guidelines. As long as you check in everyday, it shouldn’t be a problem!

  • Colleen

    Love it!!!!