Best of Office Weekly Roundup: Yummy Thanksgiving Plates

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Thanksgiving is a time for family members to get together and be thankful for all the good things they have had the luxury of enjoying in their lives. We get go catch up with family members that live in other states, watch some football, and make plans for Christmas. After everyone has settled in, we get to dig in to all the delectable plates of food. For this week’s roundup, we take a look at some of the best-known meals prepared for turkey day and their origins.

1

The staple of any Thanksgiving

You can’t go wrong with pumpkin anything, especially pumpkin pie. Although pumpkins are native to the continent of North America, they were an early export to France and it wasn’t until the early nineteenth century that the recipe for pumpkin pie began to show up in North American cookbooks. Today, pumpkin pies are as popular as ever, and we’ll be enjoying them even from the grave!

A childhood favorite

A childhood favorite

Macaroni and cheese is as synonymous with childhood as peanut butter and tree houses. There are many varieties of this childhood classic, including just buying it in a box with ingredients that only require boiling water. Real cooks will tell you that you that you have to use real cheese, and we’re not going to argue that delicious point.

Home style is the best style

Home style is the best style

Another mainstay of a traditional Thanksgiving dinner is cranberry sauce. It was originally made by a cranberry grower in New Jersey who made it out of the bad cranberries she would throw out of her good berries. Two interesting facts about cranberry sauce: It is very uncommon to serve cranberry sauce before and after Thanksgiving in America and, in the UK, it is common to serve it with turkey- for Christmas.

We got the salad; you got the potatoes?

We got the salad; you got the potatoes?

Potato salad is considered a dish for the layman: it can be prepared with inexpensive ingredients, served to a large number people, and can be refrigerated until needed. It is considered a casual food that is more common at picnics and is usually eaten with the type of food you eat outdoors (pizza, hamburgers, and fried chicken, just to name a few). If you’re trying to feed a lot of people at once, potato salad is the way to go.

And who can forget the most important meal?

And who can forget the most important meal?

With the exception of that one episode of “Everybody Loves Raymond” when Debra (Ray’s wife) cooks a fish as the main course for Thanksgiving (with disastrously hilarious results), turkey is king at any Thanksgiving dinner. Cooking a turkey is not for the faint of heart: it takes several hours and the right ingredients applied at the right time in the right place at the right temperature to make a turkey, and if you’re the one who’s hosting friends and/or family, the margin for error is razor thin. No pressure, right?

Whatever you like to eat for Thanksgiving, remember that it’s really just about getting together with people who care about you and love you and being appreciative of all the fortune your life has endowed you with.